EAShttp://easternapiculture.org/component/content/category/21-conferences/eas2013.htmlSat, 01 Nov 2014 07:38:51 -0400Joomla! - Open Source Content Managementen-gbPublic Eventshttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-public-events.htmlhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-public-events.html

Two FREE Events All About Honeybees on Wednesday, August 7, 2013, 7 to 9 pm

Well Bee-ing: Your Move and Kids ’n’ Bees at West Chester University, Sykes Theater

Free Kids’ Activities • Learn How Honey Bees Make Many Foods Possible & How to Help Them!

 

West Chester, PA – What does the price of an apple, your backyard, and children’s health have in common?  Honey bees! Everyone’s invited to two free family events, Wednesday, August 7, 2013 from 7 – 9 pm, at West Chester University’s Sykes Student Union to learn about honey and honey bees, when the Eastern Apicultural Society (EAS) presents Well-Bee-ing: Your Move as well as Kids ’n’ Bees. Hear from experts about how you can help honey bees stay happy and healthy, just as they do the same for us. Families can choose either simultaneous event, or kids can enjoy the supervised Kids ’n’ Bees activities while adults attend Well-Bee-ing: Your Move.

Without honey bees, many of your favorite foods would cost a lot more – or disappear altogether. Honey bees are vital to our economy and food supply. By pollinating, they make everything from apples to pumpkins possible; the multi-billion dollar almond industry alone is totally dependent upon honeybees. Jim Bobb, Chairman of the EAS, notes that these honey bee happenings are a great way to enjoy a summer evening out while learning a little, “People ask me all the time, ‘How are the honeybees doing?’ These two events, on Wednesday, August 7, are a fun way for everyone to find the answer and learn a few simple things anyone can do to help the honeybees stay healthy.”

Well-Bee-ing: Your Move is a program and conversation to update us all on the progress of solving the mystery of Colony Collapse Disorder, responsible for a worldwide decline in the honey bee population. The panel for this event includes: Brian Snyder, Executive Director of the PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture; Douglas Tallamy, professor and author of Bringing Nature Home, which helps us understand how simply adding native plants to our yard welcomes so many more birds, butterflies, and bees; and Dennis vanEngelsdorp, world-renowned honey bee expert. All three will be in town for the EAS Annual Conference on Beekeeping http://www.easternapiculture.org/conferences/eas-2013.html being held August 5 – 9, 2013.

Free Baby Sitting? Sort of! Kids ’n’ Bees: Also from 7 to 9 pm, hands-on fun for kids aged 5 to 13 to learn: How does a bee make honey? Why do bees buzz? What does a beekeeper wear so she doesn’t get stung? Grown-ups take part or check in their children to enjoy these activities (while adults attend Well Bee-ing: Your Move). Outstanding young women selected as Honey Queens by the Pennsylvania Honey Queen program will supervise children through activities they’ve designed to share their knowledge about beloved honeybees. All this fun is free of charge, thanks to the generous sponsorship of Brushy Mountain Bee Farm, Dutch Gold Honey, Giant, and the Pennsylvania Honey Queen Program. Contact Rachel Bryson, honeyqueen@pastatebeekeepers.org, for more information about the Kids ’n’ Bees event.

Eastern Apicultural Society,www.easternapiculture.org, is the largest noncommercial beekeeping organization in North America, with 26 member states/provinces in the eastern U.S. and Canada. Founded in 1955, EAS is an international nonprofit educational organization for the education of beekeepers, Master Beekeeper certification, and excellence in honey bee research.

ADDRESS FOR BOTH EVENTS: West Chester University, Sykes Student Union Theater, 110 West Rosedale Avenue, West Chester, PA 19383.

]]>
david.meldrum@verizon.net (meldrum)2013Thu, 01 Aug 2013 18:26:04 -0400
2013 Auction and Socialhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-auction-and-social.htmlhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-auction-and-social.html

Thursday Night Social and Auction

 

As part of your overall EAS experience, please attend the Thursday Evening Social and Auction to benefit the EAS organization. This event will be held on Thursday evening, August 8, from 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM at the Red Clay Room (www.redclayroom.com/home.htm), 423 Dalmatian St., Kennett Square, PA, 19348. Please purchase a ticket, if you have not already done so, through preregistration; if you still need to buy a ticket after preregistration closes, contact the folks at the registration desk. Please bring your ticket to the dinner.

On the menu for Thursday evening will be an entrée choice between Honey Dijon Salmon and Honey Balsamic Chicken. As Kennett Square is considered the Mushroom Capital of the World, we will be sure to have some excellent mushroom soup and mushrooms accompanying other parts of our meal.

 

After dinner, we will have the live auction portion of the evening and I am looking forward to the entertainment and assistance of a professional auctioneer to make the evening go well. We are in need of donated items for the auction and this can include beekeeping-related items as well as general items of high quality that will be of interest to others. Please contact Linda Betlejeski, president@easternapiculture.org , or (610) 993-7511, for information on how to donate items.

 

Part of the decision to locate this banquet in Kennett Square was to encourage people to go out for a brief drive in the beautiful Chester County countryside. I can recommend that you set your GPS for the address given above so that you will ultimately be taken directly to the banquet location, but try to override your GPS at the beginning and start out your trip in one of two ways:

 

1. Leaving West Chester borough via Rt 52 South will take you through some interesting countryside and actually past the picnic park where the Wednesday evening picnic had just occurred the night before; or, better yet,
2. Travel south from West Chester on Rt 202 and then after about 2 miles, turn west on Rt 926--this is my favorite route for scenic countryside.


 If you are up for it and have planned for some extra time while traveling the 926 route described above, turn at the intersection onto Rt 100 South. You will travel a winding road next to the Brandywine River and after 2 or 3 miles, keen observers can look to the right and see the late Andrew Wyeth’s homestead—it looks exactly like one of his paintings and is located near some power lines as a further reference point. Continuing south on Rt 100 will lead you to the intersection with Rt 1 South. Make a right at that intersection and you will be heading on your way toward the Red Clay Room.

 

Part of the decision to locate this banquet in Kennett Square was to encourage people to go out for a brief drive in the beautiful Chester County countryside. I can recommend that you set your GPS for the address given above so that you will ultimately be taken directly to the banquet location, but try to override your GPS at the beginning and start out your trip in one of two ways:

  1. Leaving West Chester borough via Rt 52 South will take you through some interesting countryside and actually past the picnic park where the Wednesday evening picnic had just occurred the night before; or, better yet,
  2. Travel south from West Chester on Rt 202 and then after about 2 miles, turn west on Rt 926--this is my favorite route for scenic countryside.

 

            If you are up for it and have planned for some extra time while traveling the 926 route described above, turn at the intersection onto Rt 100 South. You will travel a winding road next to the Brandywine River and after 2 or 3 miles, keen observers can look to the right and see the late Andrew Wyeth’s homestead—it looks exactly like one of his paintings and is located near some power lines as a further reference point. Continuing south on Rt 100 will lead you to the intersection with Rt 1 South. Make a right at that intersection and you will be heading on your way toward the Red Clay Room.

]]>
david.meldrum@verizon.net (meldrum)2013Sun, 30 Jun 2013 21:09:25 -0400
2013 Directionshttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-directions.htmlhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-directions.html

Registration Desk

The EAS Registration and Information Desk is on the first floor (street level) at:
Sykes Student Union Building
110 W. Rosedale Avenue,
West Chester, PA 19383S
Sykes is located on W. Rosedale Avenue, between High Street and New Street.

 Campus Map
WCUmap

Parking

Free parking for EAS is directly behind Sykes; it can be reached by turning off West Rosedale Avenue at Church or Roslyn Avenues, then turning onto Norfolk Avenue.

 

Directions to EAS 2013

 

From Philadelphia:

Take Schuylkill Expressway (Rt. 76 West) to exit #328. Follow Rt. 202 South, West Chester, for approximately 20 minutes. Take High Street exit to second traffic light at Rosedale Ave. and turn left. Sykes will be on the left.
Or take West Chester Pike (Rt. 3 West) to Rt. 202 S. by-pass. Follow Rt. 202 S. to High Street exit. Go to second traffic light at Rosedale Avenue and turn left. Sykes will be on the left.

 

From States West and Western PA via PA Turnpike:

Take PA Turnpike to exit #312, Downingtown. Follow signs for Rt. 100 South. Shortly after the intersection of Rts. 100 and 30, follow the signs for Pottstown Pike. Route 100 S. will become High Street in the borough of West Chester. Stay on High Street until you come to Rosedale Avenue where the cornerstone of the University is located. Turn right, Sykes will be on the left.

 

From Central NY and Northeast PA via PA turnpike Northeast Extension:

At midcounty, follow signs for PA Turnpike West (Harrisburg) and take exit #326, Valley Forge. Go about 1/4 mile to exit #328, to Rt. 202 South, West Chester, and continue for approximately 20 minutes. Take the High Street exit. Continue north on High Street to the second traffic light at Rosedale Avenue. Turn left, Sykes will be on the left.

 

From States Northeast of Philadelphia via NJ turnpike:

Take Exit #6 for PA Turnpike. Follow PA Turnpike West for approximately 35 miles and take exit #326, Valley Forge. Go about 1/4 mile to exit #328, to Rt. 202 South, West Chester, and continue for approximately 20 minutes. Take the High Street exit. Continue north on High Street to the second traffic light at Rosedale Avenue. Turn left, Sykes will be on the left.

 

From Commodore Barry Bridge (NJ):

Coming from either North or South on New Jersey Rt. 295, follow signs for Rt. 322 West. (Bridge is on 322 W.) Cross bridge and continue on 322 W. to Rt. 1. Turn left on Rt. 1 to Rt. 202 North. Turn right on Rt. 202 N. and continue for approximately seven miles. At the Holiday Inn proceed straight ahead under the overpass, following the signs for the Business District, Rt. 322. Continue north on High Street to the second traffic light at Rosedale Avenue. Turn left on Rosedale, Sykes will be on the left.

 

From States South and Delaware Memorial Bridge:

Take Rt. 95 North through Wilmington to the exit for Rt. 202 N. (Concord Pike). Continue north on 202. (From the intersections of Rts. 1 and 202, it is approximately seven miles to West Chester.) At the Holiday Inn, proceed straight ahead under the overpass, following the signs for the Business District, Rt. 322. Continue north on High Street to the second traffic light at Rosedale Avenue. Turn left on Rosedale, Sykes will be on the left.

 

Exton Train Station (6 miles north of WCU)

]]>
david.meldrum@verizon.net (meldrum)2013Thu, 06 Jun 2013 02:27:34 -0400
2013 Vendor Informationhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-05-30-17-16-34.htmlhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-05-30-17-16-34.html

Information for Vendors

As a vendor you can view and download a packet of information on how to become a vendor at EAS 2013  View Vendor Packet.

 

To become a vendor, dowload the vendor Application Form.  Fill it out and send it to:

Greg Fariss, 142 Cemetery Road, Mocksville, NC 27028
336-998-2975
treasurer@easternapiculture.org
Form and Money MUST Be Received by July 15, 2013

]]>
david.meldrum@verizon.net (meldrum)2013Thu, 30 May 2013 17:36:57 -0400
Apitherapy Symposiumhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/apitherapy-symposium.htmlhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/apitherapy-symposium.html

Apitherapy Symposium

Thursday, August 8, 2013
8:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

You likely know something about acupuncture, but have you heard about apitherapy, which therapeutically combines acupuncture and bee venom?  Do you know that honey bees make a “glue” called propolis that has antibiotic properties?  Have you heard that honey and honey bee collected pollen may reduce allergic responses to pollen?  The President of the American Apitherapy Society (AAS), Frederique Keller, DOM, L.Ac, will speak about therapeutic uses of honey bee products and conduct two workshops at West Chester University on August 8, 2013, as one component of the meeting of the Eastern Apicultural Society’s (EAS) annual meeting.  Holding a Masters of Science degree in Oriental Medicine and a license in Acupuncture, Frederique Keller will share her knowledge and experience in honey bee related therapies.  Come and see a demonstration of bee venom therapy and make a jar of propolis-containing salve to take home!

The cost for the Thursday event is $65 plus membership in either EAS ($25) or AAS. Registrants may attend the apitherapy classes and any other beekeeping session taking place that day. Registration options can be found at www.easternapiculture.org. The onsite registration desk opens at 7:00 a.m. For more information contact Greg Fariss at treasurer@easternapiculture.org or 336-998-2975.

 

Apitherapy Schedule
7:00-8:30Breakfast (Cafeteria)
8:00-8:30Apitherapy Overview and Beekeeping
Frederique Keller L. Ac., President AAS,
Craig Byer, Board Member AAS
8:30-9:00Pollen and Bee Bread
Frederique Keller L. Ac., President AAS,
Craig Byer, Board Member AAS
9:00-9:30Propolis: Collection, Preparations, and
Indications
Frederique Keller L. Ac., President AAS,
Craig Byer, Board Member AAS
9:30-10:00 Break
10:00–noonBee Venom Therapy; Applications & Technique (informed Consent Form for people participating  in afternoon Bee Venom Workshop)
Frederique Keller L. Ac., President AAS,
Craig Byer, Board Member AAS
noon-1:30Lunch Break
1:30–3:00Bee Venom Therapy Practical Demonstration
Frederique Keller L. Ac., President AAS,
Craig Byer, Board Member AAS
3:00 - 3:30Break (vendor Area)
3:30 - 5:30The Colors of Propolis & Salve-making
Frederique Keller L. Ac., President AAS,
Craig Byer, Board Member AAS

www.apitherapy.org

 

]]>
david.meldrum@verizon.net (meldrum)2013Wed, 29 May 2013 14:34:22 -0400
2013 Master Beekeepershttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-mastr-beekeepers.htmlhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-mastr-beekeepers.html

Master Beekeepers

The Master Beekeeper Certification Committee would like to invite qualified EAS members to apply for this year’s certification exam. Persons interested in applying should have a minimum of five years as a serious beekeeper in some aspect of apiary management, such as a very dedicated hobbyist, a commercial beekeeper, working for a commercial beekeeper, or as an apiary inspector. Anyone wishing to take the Master Beekeeper Certification Exam should submit an application and recommendation by mail to: Susan Fariss, EAS Secretary, 142 Cemetery Road, Mocksville, NC 27028, or by email to mbcertification@easternapiculture.org. The application and recommendation forms can be downloaded from the EAS website or requested from the Secretary. The deadline for application is July 1, 2013. More information about the Master Beekeeper Certification application process and the exam can be found on the Master Beekeeper webpage at www.easternapiculture.org.

This year’s schedule at the conference will include an open review session on Wednesday, August 7, 2013, at 4:00 p.m. The field exam will take place on Wednesday afternoon, before the review and the written, lab, and oral exams will take place on Thursday, August 8, 2013. The Master Beekeeper Certification Committee will be happy to answer questions; our email address is mbcertification@easternapiculture.org.

 

Master Beekeeper Schedule
Exam ReviewWed4:00-5:30 p.m.Sykes 252
Field ExamWednoon-5:30 p.m.Beeyard
ExamsThu8:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.Merion 109 (lab)
Merion 112 (written)
Sykes 306 (oral)
Sykes 303 (oral)
Annual Meeting
(Breakfast working meeting)
Fri7:00-8:00 a.m.Sykes 252
Exam Review
(Candidates receive scores
and get questions answered)
Fri4:15-5:00 p.m.Sykes 252
]]>
david.meldrum@verizon.net (meldrum)2013Mon, 20 May 2013 02:10:26 -0400
2013 Train the Trainerhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-train-the-trainer.htmlhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-train-the-trainer.html

 

Train-the-Trainer

How to teach beekeeping…not what to teach

EAS Short Course

Tuesday, August 6, 2013; 8:00 am – 4:30 pm

 This Session is Full...

Put Your Name on the Waiting List


As beekeeping has increased in popularity along with its positive public perception, the demand for beekeeper education—particularly at the beginner level—has never been greater.  One chokepoint in beekeeper education has been the small supply of good beekeeping teachers who can provide quality educational experiences.  

The goal of this program is to provide training in how to conduct an efficient bee school.  This will help improve content delivery, maximize student learning, and promote beekeeping. The intent of this workshop is to learn how to teach effectively, leaving it up to each individual instructor what to teach. In short, this workshop is not about what to teach, but how to teach it.

Lectures will include: the right mixture of theory and practice; what makes a bad presentation; teaching young beekeepers; using the BEES network in your bee school; crafting a test; and putting it all together.  

In the all-day training and workshops you will:

  • Learn various tips and techniques about improving content delivery
  • Gain experience in applying some of the more common techniques for teaching beekeeping
  • Become confident in being able to develop a curriculum for beekeeper education at any level of expertise
  • Discuss with other bee school instructors potential pitfalls in conducting a bee school and means by which they can be avoided or overcome

Preregistration is required for the limited number of seats. The workshop is comprehensive so that all participants are expected to remain through the entire day. Priority will be given to those who have or plan to conduct a beginner bee school so that we can learn from each other about what works, what doesn't, and what to expect from many different perspectives.

Feel free to bring along a syllabus to critique and discuss with others.


Instructors will be David R. Tarpy, Program Director & Extension Apiculturist, NC State; Bill Mares, EAS Education Committee Chairman; and others.

Bill Mares is the immediate past president of EAS and the Vermont Beekeepers Association. His organization and skill produced one of the finest and most well-attended conference in decades. Bill co-chairs the EAS Education Committee. Seek him out at EAS 2013 for his wit and pith.

David Tarpy hales from Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, although he is now famous for his queen biology and other research at North Carolina State University. After building one of the largest and most successful state master beekeeper organizations, he has recently developed an online education platform called BEES. See David online or in person at EAS 2013.

]]>
david.meldrum@verizon.net (meldrum)2013Mon, 06 May 2013 20:32:28 -0400
EAS 2013 Program Noteshttp://easternapiculture.org/component/content/article/21-conferences/eas2013/79-eas-2013-program-notes.htmlhttp://easternapiculture.org/component/content/article/21-conferences/eas2013/79-eas-2013-program-notes.html

Short Course

 

In addition to the regular short course classes, two special elective classes have been added.

 

TopBar Hives (Monday):

The beeyard part of Top Bar Hives instruction is limited to 25 people. Please reserve your spot at registration.  Once the first session is full, we will offer afternoon sessions run by other beekeepers.

 

Train the Trainer (Tuesday):

The goal of this program is to provide training in how to conduct an efficient bee school.  This will help improve content delivery, maximize student learning, and promote beekeeping. The intent of this workshop is to learn how to teach effectively, leaving it up to each individual instructor what to teach. In short, this workshop is not about what to teach, but how to teach it.

 

 

]]>
david.meldrum@verizon.net (meldrum)2013Mon, 06 May 2013 20:25:20 -0400
Microscope Explorationshttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/microscope-explorations.htmlhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/microscope-explorations.html

Microscope Explorations

Come Explore with us.

 dandelion pollen 1nosema spores3

WHAT IS IT?*  Please join us at the microscope "wet lab" during EAS 2013…

Your chance to see pollen, pathogens and parasites in real time - these are no mere images!  Learn to identity pollen, whether collected from your bees' knees or found in your honey.  Does this help identify what type of nectar sources your bees visited and therefore what type of honey is in the hive?  Diagnose common bacterial and viral infections peculiar to the honey bee.  Review the life cycle of their parasites to form the basis of your husbandry decisions.

Sticky Board

This sticky board at 30X, was removed in December, after feeding syrup longer than commonly advised.  Consider the evidence: fresh, clean wax scales and mold filaments.  These may indicate young workers - and even brood - well into November, along with humid conditions, possibly created by the board impeding air flow and the water content of the syrup.  Don Coats, a member of the EAS 2013 Planning Committee, is developing this workshop and invites you to think about microscopic explorations in beekeeping.  Please reply to doncoats@verizon.net with your ideas and questions to explore at the microscope "wet lab"  in West Chester, PA.  August 5-9, 2013.

 

Microscopes kindly provided by Microscope.commicroscope

]]>
david.meldrum@verizon.net (meldrum)2013Fri, 22 Feb 2013 01:32:53 -0500
2013 Honey Showhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-honey-show.htmlhttp://easternapiculture.org/conferences/conference-archive/eas-2013/2013-honey-show.html

New Bigger and Better Honey Show this Year

Information will be included in your Program book and also posted in the Registration Area when you arrive, along with the exact location of the drop-off area and of the Show itself.

ATTENTION! ALL HONEY SHOW PARTICIPANTS
If you use a Gamber Classic jar when entering the liquid honey categories and win 1st place you’ll receive a $100 Gamber Container gift certificate, if you win 2nd place you’ll receive a $50 Gamber Container gift certificate. This is a change from past years when Gamber offered a Savings Bond in each of these categories.

 

Bring your entries to the ‘Common Grounds’ room on the main (1st floor) of the Sykes Student Union Center at West Chester University.

honeyJudge 

Drop Off Show Entries:
Tuesday August 6th 1:30-4:30 p.m.
Wednesday August 7th 10:30 a.m.–noon and 1:30-3:00 p.m.

Awards will be announced On Thursday

Post Show Pick Up Entries
Friday After 3:15 p.m.

Show Rules, click hereYou can print them out.

 

1. Extracted Honey (6 Classes – White, Light, Lt Amber, Amber, Dark, Creamed)
2. Black Jar (Honey) – Single Class - Any color honey, opaque jar, best taste
3. Comb Honey (5 Classes – Section Box, Cut Comb, Circular Section, Chunk, Frame of Honey)
4. Beeswax (4 Classes - Single piece, Dipped candles, Molded candles, Novelty candles)
5. Mead & Honey Beer (4 & 2 Classes – Dry, Sweet, Sparkling or Fruit Mead & Lt./Med or Braggot Honey Beer)
6. Arts & Crafts (4 Classes – Gift arrangement, Sewing or needlepoint, Novelty beeswax, Misc.)
7. Photography (4 Classes – Close-up, Scenic, Portrait, Essay)

8. Gadget Show (2 Classes – Large & Small Devices)
9. Honey Cookery (7 Classes – Cookies, Bars/Brownies, Cake, Yeast Bread, Yeast Rolls, Muffins, Candy)

 

Please thank and support our generous award sponsors by patronizing their businesses whenever you can!

  • Extracted Honey – Dutch Gold Honey (Lancaster, PA)
  • Black Jar (Honey) – Montgomery County Beekeepers Association (PA)
  • Comb Honey – Walter T. Kelley Company (Clarkson, KY)
  • Beeswax – Bee Culture Magazine (Medina, OH)
  • Mead & Honey Beer – Allagash Brewing Company, Inc. (Portland, ME)
  • Arts & Crafts – Maine State Beekeepers Association
  • Photography – American Bee Journal (Hamilton, IL)
  • Gadget Show – Brushy Mountain Bee Farm (Moravian Falls, NC & New Columbia, PA)
  • Honey Cookery – TBD
  • Sweepstakes – Pennsylvania State Beekeepers Association
  • Best of Show - Hackenberg Apiaries (Lewisburg, PA)

 

Need help? Click here for articles on preparing for the show.


 

Not Just Another Honey Show For EAS 2013

by Brian Marcy

Mike Palmer returns from the success of EAS Vermont to assist me, Doylestown, PA beekeeper, Brian Marcy, in the planning of another round of extraordinary show competitions for EAS 2013 at West Chester University in West Chester, PA. It’s a Honey Show. It’s a Beeswax Show. It’s a Mead Show. It’s an Arts & Crafts, Gadgets, Cookery and Photography Show. Be creative. Be precise. Be careful and check your creations twice - then thrice! First-timer? Why not.Every-timer? Welcome back! Read the rules and watch the web; there’ll be more to learn about the EAS competitions ahead.

Having grown up in Minnesota, I visit the ‘Great Get Together’, Minnesota’s State Fair, every summer with family.Each year I marvel at the oceans of state fair goers who, like me, pack themselves shoulder-to-shoulder into exhibit halls to see the annual flush of award ribbons for the year’s yield of crops, cakes, quilts, cows, and the myriad other crafted and living projects on display, including honey. I often catch myself wishing I was the judge of any one of the food competitions and wondering how entrants find the time and talent to create their wonderful entries.Living in Pennsylvania, I am most fortunate to repeat those experiences every January at the Pennsylvania Farm Show, the largest indoor agricultural event in the United States. Like a summer fair, the PA Farm Show exhibits the entries of the sweetest commodity of all – honey, along with all other honey bee products & creations. As a relatively new beekeeper, and even newer EAS attendee, I was excited to learn of Mike’s passion for the EAS Honey Show in Vermont and to see elements of a show that could rival some of the best shows in the country.

Let’s make a great honey show even better! For your part, prepare an entry – or several! Visit the EAS website often to find the show rules, to check details and updates about the EAS show competitions and to seek guidance on how to prepare your entries. Be sure that you read the show rules – ALL the rules! The show rules are the same as last year, but this year, deductions will not be made for glassware imperfections, in applicable categories, that are beyond the control of the entrant.

Judges will of course have category expertise for the entries that they evaluate, but this year we’re planning to provide entrants with more space to display their entries and more room for visitors to view and enjoy them. In addition to ribbon awards to acknowledge excellent entries, best in class entrants will win a beautiful engraved silver plate for their respective categories. The Best of Show entrant will be awarded a magnificent engraved silver bowl. For the epitome of bragging rights, be the EAS Sweepstakes winner, an award given to the entrant with the most wins, any wins, in all categories. Maybe you?!

bring your entries to the ‘Common Grounds’ room on the main (1st floor) of the Sykes Student Union
Center at West Chester University
]]>
david.meldrum@verizon.net (meldrum)2013Thu, 21 Feb 2013 22:31:00 -0500