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2010 Home

Overview Presentation

Travel

Schedule
  Short Course
  Conference

Honey Show Rules

Speakers

Area Activities

Registration

Handouts




2010 Home

Overview Presentation

Travel

Schedule
  Short Course
  Conference

Honey Show Rules

Speakers

Area Activities

Registration

Handouts




2010 Home

Overview Presentation

Travel

Schedule
  Short Course
  Conference

Honey Show Rules

Speakers

Area Activities

Registration

Handouts
Home > Conference Archive > Speakers

EAS 2010  August 2-6, 2010
Boone, North Carolina

Speakers

Jennifer Berry is the Research Coordinator at the University Of Georgia Honey Bee Research Lab in Athens, Georgia. She works with Dr. Keith Delaplane on a variety of projects, many aimed at reducing chemical use in a managed colony, or measuring the effects of chemical use on bees. In her spare time she is a queen breeder and producer.
Nick Calderone is the Apiculture Extension Specialist at Cornell University, Ithaca New York. He teaches classes at the University level, conducts honey bee and beekeeping research there, and teaches the Cornell Master Beekeeper classes. He coordinated the Level 2 Short Course this year, and is speaking at the Conference.
Bob Cole is an EAS stalwart. A former Chairman of the Board, the first EAS Master Beekeeper, and a tireless advocate for bees and beekeeping worldwide, Bob is a friend to all and a great ambassador to the association. He is also a resident of Boone, NC.
Clarence Collison is head of the EAS Master Beekeeper program and serves on the EAS Board. He is frequently a speaker at the EAS Short Course and on the Program. He was awarded the Outstanding Research Contribution Award from Apiary Inspectors. In addition to the book he is author of popular Bee Culture column “What do you Know?”
Bob Danka is a USDA Researcher at the Baton Rouge Bee Breeding lab, where he has been for over 20 years. His expertise is in managing varroa mites through genetic controls, as well as pollination of commercial stock. He is one of the many excellent USDA scientists who are making positive, significant impacts on the managed honey bee population.
Billy Davis is an EAS Master Beekeeper, recipient of Virginia’s Langstroth Award for Excellence, and currently the EAS Director from Virginia. He is now working to develop a regional Queen Project, Virginia based and sanctioned by the Loudoun Beekeepers Association and the Virginia Beekeepers Association. Practical Beekeeping for Beginners, a “formal nine week class”, annually starts 100-140 new beekeeping members.
David De Jong graduated from Cornell University, then received an MS and PhD in Entomology at Cornell University under the guidance of Roger Morse. Currently he is a Professor at the Universidade de São Paulo, where he has had a long and distinguished career in honey bee genetics, parasites, and one of the world’s foremost authorities on the Africanized honey bee in Latin America. He is a specialist in Africanized bee management, biology, and behavior, and he is also well known for his research on bee pathology, especially Varroa. David helped initiate the Cornell Master Beekeepers program while studying apiculture with Roger Morse at Cornell in the 1970s. Dr. De Jong has also studied many of South America's stingless bees.
Debbie Delaney is the new Extension Apiculturist at the University of Delaware and a rising star in honey bee research and extension. Her research expertise is in the population genetics of bees, including feral honey bees and how they are genetically distinct from managed stock. Debbie also has extensive background in queen rearing and is a popular speaker among beekeeping organizations.
Keith Delaplane is Professor of Entomology at the University of Georgia and head of the UGA bee research and extension program. He is also spearheading the large, inter-institutional collaborative research effort on honey bee health, funded by the USDA-CAP program.
Galen Dively recently retired after having both extension and research responsibilities at the University of Maryland, specializing in integrated pest management, non-target risk assessment, and pesticide resistance management. His current research projects focus on the comparative risk assessment of transgenic insecticidal crops and conventional insecticides on non-target beneficial arthropods, including honey bees.
Mike Embrey is a full-time agricultural technician and extension apiculturist for the University of Maryland. He represents the University on the Mid-Atlantic Apiculture Research and Extension Consortium (MAAREC) Task Force and was on the research team awarded the 2009 EAS Foundation for Honey Bee Research Award to test the effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bee health.
Rick Fell teaches several of the basic undergraduate entomology courses including Insect Biology, Insect Biology Laboratory, and Bees and Beekeeping. His extension program is concerned with the apiculture industry and is designed to provide educational information and programs to Virginia beekeepers, as well as to industry groups of the mid-Atlantic region.
Kim Flottum is the Editor of Bee Culture magazine, author of the best selling book The Backyard Beekeeper, and a new work entitled The Honey Handbook, Producing Varietal and Artisan Honey. He is a regular contributor to the Beekeeper’s Quarterly, several regional and national farm magazines and web pages. He is Chairman Emeritus of EAS and is the President of EAS for 2009.
Maryann Frazier is Extension Specialist in Apiculture at Penn State, and is both a teacher of teachers and beekeepers. Recent research has been focused on the relationship of pesticides found in the hive and honey bee health, and how all of this is tied to Colony Collapse Disorder. She also brings a wealth of experience and success in SARE funded projects on bees and pollination.
Steve Gibson is a recently retired Extension Agent from Cleveland County, NC, where he continues to work on behalf of local beekeepers. He wealth of knowledge and experience in agricultural chemicals make him a valued resource for understanding how to keep honey bees healthy in agroecosystems.
Jack Hanel is one of the marvelous NCDA Apiary inspectors. A resident of Black Mountain, NC, his region of responsibility is the mountains of Western NC, from Murphy to Boone and everything in between. Jack and his colleagues work tirelessly with the state’s beekeepers to keep a healthy and thriving population, as well as to educate beekeepers in proper management techniques.
Ann Harman started as a research chemist, but got into bees at UMD and has created a second career as an International Consultant, teaching beekeeping skills and modern management techniques in 26 countries on five continents. She is an EAS Master Beekeeper and frequent Bee Short course instructor. You can read her monthly column in Bee Culture; she publishes regular articles for Beekeepers Quarterly, and Bee Craft. She has been vice-chairman of EAS as well as a past president.
Jeff Harris is a Research Entomologist at the USDA-ARS Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics, and Physiology Research Laboratory with a research background in insect physiology. His research primarily is aimed at finding and selecting specific traits of bees associated with resistance to varroa mites, which have been combined to create improved resistant stocks.
Christi Heintz has been managing production research for the California almond industry for the past 12 years. She currently operates as a research consultant, managing pollination research for both the almond industry and Project Apis m. Christi also manages the environmental sustainability program for the Almond Board. Christi holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from UC Davis and has been a hobby beekeeper.
Mike Hood is Professor of Entomology at Clemson University, South Carolina. Mike is a diversified expert in IPM of wax moths, varroa mites, and small hive beetles.
Don Hopkins started with bees in NJ as a youngster before moving to NC as apiary inspector. He has been active with Partners of Americas in beekeeping development in Haiti and Bolivia as well as Kazcistan. He is active with Short courses and workshops and helped train new NC beekeepers with the Golden Leaf Project (funds from tobacco settlement used to establish new beekeepers).
Zachary Huang's research at Michigan State University uses computational, behavioral, physiological, and biochemical methods to understand the social organization of a bee colony. His current research focuses on impact of parasites (Nosema apis, Varroa jacobsoni) on physiology and foraging behavior of worker bees. He maintains a web page for extension purpose and is working closely with Michigan beekeepers to find better strategies for pest and disease management in honey bees.
Jennifer Keller is the Apiculture Technician extraordinaire at NC State University. Her multiple responsibilities include coordinating all of the field research in the Apiculture program (including queen rearing and instrumental inseminations), maintaining the Lake Wheeler Honey Bee Research Facility south of NC State’s main campus, and conducting numerous extension activities all across the state.
Adolphus Leonard, the NCDA Apiary Inspector for the entire Eastern coast of NC, is a former bee breeder and commercial beekeeper. He, like his colleagues, are responsible for keeping the state’s bee population health and disease free.
Ed Levi the State Bee Inspector for Arkansas, is a highly sought speaker. He has travelled the world conducting beekeeping extension initiatives in third world countries. He is also very knowledgable about beekeeping and promotes the use of IPM methods and minimizes the use of chemicals.
Wyatt Mangum is a Professor of Mathematics at Mary Washington College in Virginia and is an expert in top-bar hives. He also writes the popular column in the American Bee Journal titled "Honey bee biology".
Doug McRory is the newly retired Provincial Inspector for Ontario. He is familiar to most EAS goers, and he is respected for his hard work ethic and long-time dedication to promoting best management practices for beekeeping.
David Mendes operates 7000+ hives for crop pollination and honey production. With a home base in Fort Myers Florida, he brings bees to Maine for blueberry pollination and Massachusetts for cranberry pollination each summer, and now to California for almond pollination in the winter. In the Spring and Fall the bees make honey in Florida. Dave has been a full time commercial beekeeper since 1977. He is currently the President of the American Beekeeping Federation.
Medhat Nasr is currently the Provincial Inspector for Alberta, Canada, whose career has effectively interfaced University research as well as government service. He enjoys speaking with commercial and hobbyist beekeepers alike, and he is a decorated inspector and highly coveted speaker.
Steve Pernal is the Senior Research Scientist of the Beaverlodge Apiculture Facility in Alberta Canada, their only federal honey bee research station. His areas of expertise are wide-ranging, including management and detection of diseases, antibiotic residues in honey, pollination and nutrition, and control of Nosema and parasitic mites.
Juliana Rangel is a Postdoctoral Associate at NC State University and the program coordinator for a new queen-rearing initiative in the state. A past EAS Student Award winner, Juliana's expertise is in the behavior and ecology of honey bees, particularly their collective decision-making processes during swarming.
Gary Reuter began work at the University of Minnesota in 1993, where he maintains the research colonies, helps train and work with students in the field, designs and builds specialty equipment. He is the star of their beekeeping short courses and Extension programming; beekeepers thrive on listening to his jokes. He is the past President of the MN Hobby Beekeeping Association, the Wisconsin Honey Producers Association, and he is on the Research Committee of the ABF.
Dick Rogers is the newly hired Beekeeping Specialist at Bayer Crop Science in the Research Triangle Park. A former Provincial Inspector from Nova Scotia, he brings with him a wealth of apiculture knowledge and experience.
Audrey Sheridan is a researcher in the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology at Mississippi State University. Her expertise is in Small Hive Beetles and has tested the use of BT on their control.
John Skinner is the State Extension Specialist in Beekeeping in Tennessee. His focus is on IPM for Varroa, but pollination and honey plants are also on his agenda.
Bart Smith is the well-respected and highly able research technician at the Beltsville USDA bee lab. A recognized expert in disease diagnoses and bioassays, Bart has helped to train scientists and beekeepers alike in identifying and diagnosing various brood and bee diseases to help keep them in check.
Dennis vanEnglesdorp is acting State Apiary Inspector and a graduate student at Penn State who will very soon receive his Ph.D. He is a Canadian native and holds an MS from Guelph University (Ontario). He worked three years in the Caribbean with NGO’s in beekeeping development before coming to Pennsylvania. He is one of the driving forces behind research and extension on CCD, and he is a gifted speaker who has a fresh perspective on familiar topics.
Clarie Waring is the editor of Bee Craft magazine in the UK and a gifted natural-light photographer of bees and flowers. Claire has kept bees since 1980. Following the establishment of a beekeeping project in Nepal in 1994, Claire was active in the foundation of the UK charity Bees Abroad, which aims to relieve poverty through beekeeping. The charity now has projects in Nepal, Cameroon, Malawi, and Kenya. Claire was appointed editor of Bee Craft in 1997 and with husband Adrian recently written Teach Yourself Beekeeping. She also is Secretary for the British Alpaca Society.
Bronwyn Weaver is a local food activist in the Chicago area who is spearheading efforts to connect local farmers and beekeepers with the restaurant industry.
James Wilkes is the Department Chair of the Computer Science Department at Appalachian State University and avid hobbyist beekeeper. He and his colleagues are developing exciting new tools for record keeping and apiary management for beekeepers at all scales.
Geoff Williams is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Halifax (NS, Canada) and a previous EAS Student Award winner. Geoff is a rising star in apicultural research, particularly in understanding ecological interactions between Nosema apis and N. ceranae infection. In addition, he is at the forefront of investigating the use of the antibiotic fumagillin dicyclohexylammonium, commonly used to control Nosema.
Michael Young teaches Culinary Arts at the Belfast Institute, Northern Ireland. He has been President of the Ulster Beekeepers' Association, Chairman of Dromore District Beekeepers' Association, and co-founder and Chairman of the Institute of Northern Ireland Beekeepers. Michael writes extensively for American and English bee magazines in areas of gourmet cooking with honey, encaustic wax painting, mead making, plus candle and wax model making. He has been a special feature of previous EAS meetings (including Maine where he cooked our lobster).
Jon Zawislak is an EAS Master Beekeeper and Cooperative Extension Agent from Little Rock, Arkansas.


Updated September 6, 2010