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Home > Programs/Events > Conference Archive > 2005 > Program > Workshops > Dr. George Ayers

Workshops by Dr. George Ayers

In August, Dr. Ayers presented several papers at the EAS meeting in Kent Ohio. He felt that the following might be useful to some EAS members.

Photographing flowers

Knock your socks off photos sometimes just happen, but more often they are well thought out. The quality of a photo is determined by composition, exposure and focus. The following references are technique-oriented publications that explain these three features. Each is worth reading, and each will add something to your photography, even if you read all of them. All deal with film photography, but good technique for film is also good technique for digital photography.

  • Shaw, John. 2000. John Shaw’s Nature Photography Field Guide. Amphoto books. New York. ISBN 0-8174-4059-3.
  • Shaw, John. 1987. John Shaw’s Closeups in Nature. Amphoto books. New York. ISBN 0-8174-4052-6.
  • Blacklock, C and N. Blacklock. 1987. Photographing Wildflowers. Voyageur Press. Stillwater, MN. ISBN 0-89658-069-5
  • Fielder, John. 1996. Photographing the Landscape-The Art of Seeing. Westcliffe Publishers. ISBN 1-56579-228-9

Filling 60 years of Vacuum

Frank Pellett’s classic book, "American Honey Plants", was essentially last edited in 1947. The Beekeeping industry has been without an updated version of such a work for almost 60 year. A more up-to-date version is currently being prepared and is being published in the American Bee Journal. Each writing in ABJ discusses several honey plants of a particular plant family. This practice allows beekeepers who do not keep their magazines for long periods of time to remove these pages and store them by family in a notebook for future reference. The material is also appearing in an only slightly abbreviated version on the web at www.plants.bees.net. As planned, the ABJ material will eventually be combined into a book. The editor of the American Bee Journal invites you to comment both on format and content.

Honey plants you should know

Flowers you should know. This talk was divided into three sections: Flowers of historical importance, Flowers of current importance in the Eastern U.S, and Flowers for your bee Garden. Listed below are the flowers that were shown as well as the date and locality of when and where each picture was taken.

Flowers of Historical Importance

  1. Trifolium ambiguum (Pellett Clover, Kura clover). Michigan State University Agronomy Farm, 6/9/01.
  2. Trifolium ambiguum older flower head. Same as #1.
  3. Echinops Sphaerocephalus (Chapman honey plant). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. Michigan, 7/21/01.
  4. Echinops Sphaerocephalus (Chapman honey plant). Same as #3.
  5. Echinops Sphaerocephalus (Chapman honey plant). Same as #3.
  6. Scrophularia marilandica (Simpson honey plant). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. MI 7/21/01.
  7. Agastache foeniculum (Pellett's wonder honey plant, anise hyssop). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. Mi 7/21/01.
  8. Vitex negundo heterophylla (Chaste bush). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. Mi. 7/23/00.

Flowers of current importance

  1. Salix bebbiana male (a willow). The Morton Arboretum, near Chicago 4/20/02
  2. Salix bebbiana female. Same as #9.
  3. Cladrastus kentukea (American yellow wood). Michigan State University, 5/29/00
  4. Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. MI. , 5/27/00
  5. Trifolium repens (white clover). East Lansing, MI, 5/29/00
  6. Nyssa ogeche female (Tupelo). Wewahitchka, Fl 5/4/05
  7. Nyssa ogeche male. Same as #14.
  8. Alfalfa color samples. Michigan State University Agronomy farm sometime early to mid June (first cutting time).
  9. Alfalfa of different colors (white). Same as #16.
  10. Alfalfa of different colors (tan). Same as #16.
  11. Alfalfa of different colors (yellow). Same as #16.
  12. Alfalfa color samples (light purple). Same as #16.
  13. Alfalfa color samples (darker purple).. Same as #16.
  14. Alfalfa color samples (Dark purple). Same as #16.
  15. Alfalfa color samples (almost black). Same as #16.
  16. Alfalfa untripped. Same as #16.
  17. Alfalfa tripped. Same as #16.
  18. Liriodendron tulipifera (tulip tree). Michigan State University Campus. 6/4/01.
  19. Tulip tree showing nectar secretion. Same as #25.
  20. Ilex opaca female (American holly). Michigan State University Campus. 5/29/00.
  21. Ilex opaca ‘Brown 9’ male.Michigan State University Campus. 5/27/01.
  22. Melilotus officinalis (yellow sweet clover). Clinton Co. MI. 6/6/01.
  23. Melilotus alba (White sweet clover). Near Boston MA. 6/20/01.
  24. Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife). Ayers bee garden, 7/17/01.
  25. Leonurus cardiaca (motherwort). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. MI. , 6/15/00.
  26. Rhus glabra (smooth sumac). Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, near Boston, MA, 7/02/00.
  27. Diospyros virginiana female (Persimmon). Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, near Boston, MA, 6/15/01.
  28. Diospyros virginiana male (Persimmon). Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, near Boston, MA, 6/18/01.
  29. Asclepias incarnata (swamp milkweed). Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, near Boston, MA, 7/1/01.
  30. Swamp milkweed with Pollinia. Same as #36.
  31. Tilia moltkei # 39 included to show variety available in Tilia. Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, near Boston, MA, 7/3/02.
  32. Tilia mandshurica with nectar #39 included to show nectar from a Tilia. Arnold Arboretum,7/1/02.
  33. Cephalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush). Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Near Boston, MA, 7/9/02.
  34. Centaurea maculosa (spotted knapweed). Michigan star thistle) Clinton Co., MI, 8/14/00.
  35. Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle), Clinton Co., MI, 7/9/01.
  36. Impatiens capensis (Jewelweed, touch-me-not). Missouri Botanical Garden, St Louis, MO, 8/5/01.
  37. Monarda punctata (horse mint). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. MI. , 7/22/00.
  38. Oxydendrum arboreum (sourwood). Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Near Boston, MA, 7/8/00.
  39. Aster novae-angliae (New England Aster). Clinton Co., MI, 9/15/01.
  40. Solidago rigida (rigid goldenrod). Michigan wildflower farm, Portland, MI, 8/23/01.

Flowers for your bee garden

  1. Eranthis hyemalis and bee (Winter aconite). W. J. Beal Botanical Garden, Michigan State University, 2/25/02.
  2. Scilla siberica (Squill). W. J. Beal Botanical Garden, Michigan State University, 4/14/02.
  3. Squill close up. Same as # 50.
  4. Crocus mix. Michigan State University. 3/31/02.
  5. Hydrophyllum virginianum (Virginia Waterleaf). W. J. Beal Botanical Garden, Michigan State University, 6/2/02.
  6. Nepeta fassini ('6-hill giant'). Michigan State University Horticultural Garden, 5/26/00.
  7. Thymus pulegioides (thyme). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. MI, 7/22/00.
  8. Rosa rugosa (rose). Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Near Boston, MA, 6/17/02.
  9. Monarda fistulosa (wild bergamot). Michigan Wildflower Garden, Portland MI, 7/6/01.
  10. Monarda hybrid, Ayers bee garden. Clinton Co. MI, 7/8/01.
  11. Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly weed). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. MI, 6/22/.01.
  12. Pycnanthemum pilosum (mountain mint). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. MI, 9/4.02.
  13. Trifolium rubens (ornamental clover). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. MI, 6/9/01.
  14. Koelreuteria paniculata (golden-raintree). Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, near Boston, MA, 7/3/00.
  15. Golden-rain tree. Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, near Boston, MA, 7/8/02.
  16. Tilia mongolica (Mongolian linden). The Morton Arboretum, near Chicago, IL, Unrecorded date.
  17. Sedum spectabile ('Brilliant'). Michigan State University Horticultural Garden, 8/23/01.
  18. Clethra alnifolia (summer-sweet, sweet pepperbush). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co., MI, 7/23/00.
  19. Hydrangea paniculata. Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, near Boston, MA, 7/9/02.
  20. Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda tree). Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis MO, 8/6/01.
  21. Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Dark knight' (bluebeard). Michigan State University Horticultural Garden, 8/26/01.
  22. Elsholtzia stauntonii (shrub mint). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co. MI, 9/9/01.
  23. Heptacodium miconioides (seven-son flower). Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co., MI , 9/21/02.
  24. Heptacodium miconioides. late season showing red elongated sepals, Michigan State University, 10/25/02.
  25. Ilex verticillata x Ilex serrata 'Sparkleberry' showing red fruits. Ayers bee garden, Clinton Co., MI, 10/2/01.

Grafting special honey plants

To the students of Dr. Ayers’ Grafting class:

You should have cut the budding tape weeks ago. If you have not, do it now! Remember, if the leaf stem that you left on the scion shrivels up and turns black your graft probably will not take, but if drops off cleanly like a leaf should, your chances are good that the graft will take.

By now you should also have decided how you will carry your plants through the winter. The two articles in the May and July 2000 issues will help you with providing care for your plant. If you paid for these articles, and didn’t find them at the registration desk, let Dr. Ayers know and he will see that you get them.

If you were one of Dr. Ayers’ students, and you have questions about your grafts or are requesting your paid for copies of the two articles mentioned above, you may contact Dr. Ayers at the e-mail address below. If you e-mail him, be sure to indicate that the e-mail regards EAS Grafting Class.

e-Mail address: agastach@msu.edu

If you do not have e-mail, you can write to Dr. Ayers at the following address:
George Ayers
Department of Entomology
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824



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