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Bees By the Sea
EAS 2001
CAPE COD Massachusetts
August 6-10, 2001

Speaker Profiles

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Speakers are listed alphabetically by last name. The codes after each speaker's name indicates which section of the conference they will be speaking in. Speakers with "SC" will be presenting in the Short Course, "SYMP" indicates symposia presentations, and "WKSHP" indicates workshop presentations.

Photo: Wyatt MangumDr. Wyatt Mangum, PhD., (SYMP, WKSHP) Fredericksburg, VA - Mathematics Dept, Mary Washington College.

I have kept bees for over thirty years, beginning at the age of ten. During high school, I had 125 colonies as well as several observation hives in my bedroom. Currently, I manage 200 colonies. I write a column on honey bee biology for the American Bee Journal and take photographs of bee behavior. In addition, I've studied bee biology in Bolivia, Thailand, India, and Sicily. With 30 observation hives in a large new building, I continue my experimental work with queen cells and swarming. With an interest in the history of apiculture, I have written many articles on the subject. I own an extensive collection of antique beekeeping equipment, including hives dating back to the 1840's and over 100 old smokers. I enjoy sharing my knowledge of bee behavior and apicultural history by giving lectures to beekeeping associations. My interest in bees led to quite a diverse collegiate education: B. S. in Physics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, M. S. in Mathematics, and a PhD in Genetics both from North Carolina State University as well as diverse research - from experiments in bee behavior to mathematical models describing bee and mite interactions.


Jim & Penny McCaig, (WKSHP) St. Lazare, Quebec.

We started beekeeping with 3 colonies 30 years ago following a short course at MacDonald College. We increased to 100 colonies following our early retirement in 1986. We have both received Master Beekeeper certifications from EAS and the University of Guelph. We have attended all 12 of the most recent EAS conferences, have been lending a hand and holding workshops during the past several years. We have been showing honey at EAS for many years now, and have been fortunate to be Sweepstake Winners twice. For the past six years, McCaig Honey has been awarded Premier Exhibitor at the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto, Ontario and in 2000 we were honored with the Millineum Champion of Champions Award! Our favorite part of beekeeping is the field work, teaching beginners and talking to school groups.


Photo: Dave MendezDave Mendez, (SC, SYMP) commercial beekeeper, Dartmouth, MA.

I am a migratory beekeeper and commercial honey producer. My home base is North Dartmouth, MA, but I winter bees in Florida. I have some 6000 colonies and employ four full time and some seasonal help running them. I pollinate two main crops - wild blueberries in Maine, and cranberries in Massachusetts. After cranberries my bees stay in the Northeast to make honey for the remainder of the season before their return to Florida. I started my commercial beekeeping career in the mid-seventies.


Aaron Morris, (WKSHP) Round Lake, NY.

I am an EAS Master Beekeeper, EAS Director, member of the Empire State Honey Producers, and member of the Southern Adirondack Beekeepers Association, where I have held numerous positions. I am one of the moderators of BEE-L, the oldest Internet beekeeping discussion group, which has been on-line since 1995. I operate Double A's Bees, running 60 hives producing honey, comb honey and beeswax candles.


Andy Morris, (SC) hobbyist beekeeper, Monument Beach, MA.

About seven years ago I discovered that long time acquaintances and now good friends, the Desilets, were beekeepers. I had always been intrigued by the honey bee and asked if they would "teach me all about" beekeeping. I agreed to hive-sit for a year to see if I liked it and am still at it, trying to learn all about the keeping of bees. I am an elementary school teacher, with a Bachelors degree from Bridgewater State College, and a Masters degree from Lesley University. I have taught the second grade for twenty-four years (I finally get promoted to the third grade next year). I am an active member of the Massachusetts Environmental Educators Society and have always needed a solid foundation in the natural sciences. Beekeeping dovetailed perfectly with what I teach. Every curriculum, from math, to social studies, to history, to language arts, to music, and art can 'bee' integrated within and related to beekeeping. Annually, I teach a course called "Occupants of the Hive and Their Life Cycle" at my home club (Barnstable County Beekeepers Association) bee school, and have enjoyed a position on the club's Board of Directors for several years.


Robin Mountain, (SC, WKSHP) Strachan Apairies, Yuba City, CA.

I was born and raised in South Africa, the eldest son of one of Africa's most internationally known beekeepers, Mr Peter Mountain of Mountain Honey Farms. I spent most of my free time and vacations working the 4000+ African bee colonies with my dad and his African staff. During my high school I visited with my family in Europe and stayed with Prof. Ruttner (Germany), and met Brother Adam at Buckfast Abbey (England). Towards the end of my high school years, Prof. Woyke from Warsaw University, Poland, came to South Africa to teach a group of us how to inseminate African bees. After completing high school and my active military duty, I came to the US and worked for Weaver Apiaries, raising queens and shaking packages, John Haeffili of Monta Vista, Colorado, and Presidio, TX and for Jim Powers in Kona, Hawaii. On my return to South Africa, I built my own section of my father's business starting my own company, Mountain Bee Products, and together with my wife started manufacturing protective garments for beekeepers. During the 1990's I made several trips to the US to promote our garments and to give talks and workshops on African beekeeping. At present I am the Executive Manager for Strachan Apiaries in Yuba City, California. I manage the queen rearing (New World Carniolans) and do the artificial insemination of all our breeding stock and oversee the management of our 10,000 colony operation used mainly for pollination and honey production. I am a member of the EAS, ABF, AAPA, the Californian Bee Breeders, the Californian State Beekeepers' Association, of which I am a board member for the African Honey Bee Task Force, and I am also a board member of the state-appointed African Honey Bee Task Force in California. This will be my second EAS - I was on the program last year in Maryland.


Dr. Medhat Nasr, PhD., (SC, SYMP, WKSHP) Ontario Beekeepers Association, Ontario, Canada.

I am a Tech Transfer Apiculturist for the Ontario Beekeepers Association, Ontario, Canada. This unique position is financed by the beekeeping industry and matching funds from the provincial and federal government. I am currently conducting research on Integrated Parasitic Mite Management (IPMM), breeding of tracheal mite-resistant and hygienic bee stocks, development of alternative chemicals (formic acid, oxalic acid, and essential oils) to control Varroa mites, epidemiology of Varroa mites in honey bee colonies, and residues of miticides in honey and beeswax. The developed IPMM program has been adopted by Ontario beekeepers for over 8 years. As a result, Ontario beekeepers are enjoying low (>10%) winter mortality of bee colonies, high effectiveness of Apistan, and high quality of hive products. I received the Award of Excellence in Research and Development in 1998 from Ontario Ministry of the Environment. My B.S. and M.S. degrees are in entomology at the Cairo University. I earned my doctoral degree at University of California, Davis, CA. Dr Nancy Ostiguy, Associate Professor, Penn State University I am a graduate of Cornell University's Ph.D. program in Environmental Toxicology. I began work with honey bees after watching Diana Sammataro count varroa mites on sticky boards during my first year at Penn State. I was amazed that no one had developed a better way to determine how many mites there are in a honey bee colony than to count each and every mite on a sticky board. I developed a sampling protocol for the stickyboards that reduced the time to count the mites by approximately 2/3. Since then I have continued to work on developing accurate methods to count varroa. Additionally, I am working with Diana Sammataro and Maryann Frazier at Penn State along with MAAREC to develop IPM strategies for the control of varroa. I am also interested in hive product contamination from the use of fluvalinate and coumaphos.


Photo: Nancy OstiguyDr. Nancy Ostiguy, PhD., (SC) Associate Professor, Penn State University

I am a graduate of Cornell University's Ph.D. program in Environmental Toxicology. I began work with honey bees after watching Diana Sammataro count varroa mites on sticky boards during my first year at Penn State. I was amazed that no one had developed a better way to determine how many mites there are in a honey bee colony than to count each and every mite on a sticky board. I developed a sampling protocol for the stickyboards that reduced the time to count the mites by approximately 2/3. Since then I have continued to work on developing accurate methods to count varroa. Additionally, I am working with Diana Sammataro and Maryann Frazier at Penn State along with MAAREC to develop IPM strategies for the control of varroa. I am also interested in hive product contamination from the use of fluvalinate and coumaphos.


Dr. Gard Otis, PhD., (SYMP, WKSHP) Guelph, Ontario - Professor, Environmental Biology, University of Guelph.

I received my initiation to bees by studying Africanized honey bees in South America (1975-1981). The arrival of honey bee tracheal mites in North America presented the opportunity to study their economic impact on bees and to breed mite-resistant bees. My current research is on breeding bees resistant to varroa mites, basic ecology and behavior of honey bees and parasitic mites, and the biologies of Asian honey bees. I received the EAS Hambleton Award in 1999, and have been a Professor of Apiculture at the University of Guelph, Canada, since 1982.


Dr. Jeff Pettis, PhD., (SC, SYMP) U.S. Department of Agrigulture Bee Lab, Beltsville, MD.

I am a research entomologist at the USDA Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville, MD. I am currently conducting research on the control of parasitic mites, small hive beetles and American foulbrood in honey bees. I completed B.S. and M.S degrees in entomology at the University of Georgia and my doctoral degree at Texas A&M University supported by a research agreement with the USDA Honey Bee Research Unit at Weslaco, TX. My work there focused on the reproduction and dispersal behavior of honey bee tracheal mites. I then was a postdoctoral associate at Simon Frazer University with Dr Mark Winston where I studied the role of pheromones on honey bee behavior and crop pollination as well as a study on resistance mechanism of honey bees to tracheal mites. I moved to Beltsville in 1996 and have enjoyed several EAS conferences since.


Fred Rossman, (WKSHP) Rossman Apiaries, Moultrie, GA


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